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This topic contains 3 replies, has 4 voices, and was last updated by Frank Muller Frank Muller 6 years, 3 months ago.

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  • #252
    David Snoke
    David Snoke
    Member

    Any discussions on articles in the popular press.

    #355
    David Snoke
    David
    Moderator

    Sorry, but this strikes me as like those people who every year talk of how several planets coming together in a conjunction are the Star that moved around and hovered over the house in Bethlehem. The filling of the Black Sea (or the Mediterranean) should not be reported as confirmation of a global Flood, which is what people will assume from a story like this.

    http://www.worldmag.com/2012/12/science_catches_up_to_scripture_with_evidence_of_historic_flood

     

     

    #357
    Martin Poenie
    gandaulf
    Participant

    I do not think there is any similarity to the Star. The search is based on the original studies of Ryan and Pitman who did coring samples. They showed the sudden conversion of a shallow fresh water lake to the Dead Sea. The area is in exactly the right place and approximately the right time for the flood. While the article hypes the story, the finding that there were villiages and people inundated by that flood is interesting and I think adds something to the story. Personally I am glad to see Ballard exploring this.

     

    #1065
    Frank Muller
    Frank Muller
    Participant

    Here is an article from the BBC relating to an old text that has resisted decoding for many years.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-22975809

    I quote the first paragraphs here:

    “Mysterious Voynich manuscript has ‘genuine message’

    By Melissa Hogenboom Science reporter, BBC News

    The 15th Century Voynich manuscript has been described as the world’s most mysterious book, which could be a complex code, an unknown language or simply a hoax. The message inside “the world’s most mysterious medieval manuscript” has eluded cryptographers, mathematicians and linguists for over a century.

    But a new study, published in the journal Plos One, suggests the manuscript may, after all, hold a genuine message. Scientists say they found linguistic patterns they believe to be meaningful words within the text.”

    What I find intriguing about this article is the algorithm by which the scientists deduced that the manuscript contained meaningful content. Does this equate to “intelligent design”? And, if so, could a similar algorithm be applied to natural events to determine whether they contain hints of intentionality or not?

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